import 4.code.options;
import 4.code.about;

class Header{

public void title(){

String fullTitle = "/tg/ - Traditional Games";
}

public void menu();

public void board();

public void goToBottom();

public void refresh(a);

}
class Thread extends Board{
public void EmptyTitle(OP Anonymous){

String fullTitle = "EmptyTitle";
int postNumber = "60809355";
String image = "51TWZtCGUwL._SX347_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg";
String date = "07/12/18(Thu)08:44:25";
String comment = "Other than the golem and maybe some contextless reference to Lilith, have you ever tried using Jewish folklore or mythology in your games? Not just the bible (let's define that "Jewish mythology", if you will), but folklore and fairytales.";

}
public void comments(){
if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60809372 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)08:45:51")

"I made the Wandering Jew as a PC once, but that's more Christian folklore.

Good luck with your thread OP!"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60810038 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)09:46:47")

">>60809355
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Jewish_legendary_creatures

Alukah; vampiric entity
Armilus; evil pseudo-messiah
Bar Juchne; Giant bird, in effect Roc
Behemoth; big meaty monster or animal
Broxa; like a stirge
Chol; phoenix
Dybbuk; possessing spirit so a ghost
Elioud; half mortal/half celestial (fallen), a race"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60810080 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)09:49:21")

">>60809355
I played Aquelarre a lot, Jews Qabalists belong to the fire."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60810135 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)09:53:53")

">>60809355
Emite; dread giants
Estries; female vampires
Gibborim; celestials
Gog and Magog; goblinoids and/or orcs etc
Leviathan; sea dragon
Mazikeen; evil invisible air elementals and similar beings
Naamah; demon that curses children
Rahab; sea monster or sea dragon
Re'em; oxen
Ziz; roc-sized griffin
Rephaite; giants
Shedim; wights/wraiths or yuan-ti perhaps
Solomon's shamir; vorpal material
Tannin; howling draconic sea monster"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60810261 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)10:03:33" && image=="2a792fa0778798ab2d4a8b93e6ba023d.gif")

">>60810135
From what I read, the Shamir was a worm the size of a grain of wheat whose "gaze" was so powerful it could instantly cut through any material except lead, "without wasting so much as [an atom]" (or the equivalent archaic phrasing). Because Solomon was forbidden from using iron or bronze at any point during the process of building the temple (as these are used to make weapons, and would render the temple unholy), the Shamir was deemed the only means of cutting the stones and gemstones required for the construction. God has foreseen this, and created the Shamir in the dawn of time, entrusting it to a woodpecker in a lead box (some believe it was actually recovered once before, by an angel, to inscribe the Ten Commandments on top of Mount Sinai).

After finishing his work, King Solomon put the Shamir back in the box, lest the power of its gaze be used for evil. According to some versions of the myth, since then the Shamir has aged and its gaze is now a lot weaker. It's possible it might've just died."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60810784 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)10:49:46")

">>60810261
worm with vorpal gaze, are you sure it was not the fabled "blue steel" ?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D519hT7-ytY"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60810945 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)11:01:24")

">>60810784
All a part of God's plan"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60811050 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)11:10:08")

">>60810261
this is one weird story"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60813331 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)13:49:55")

">>60810261
This is really, really cool. Thanks for sharing it!"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60813358 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)13:51:34")

">>60811050
Jewish mythology is the mythology of loopholes and rules."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60813382 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)13:53:06")

">>60813358
>Jewish mythology is the mythology of loopholes and rules.
I've learned a lot about this aspect of Jewish mythology through /tg/ in the past couple of years. Got any more gems?"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60813640 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)14:13:10")

">>60813358
How's that the story of a loophole?"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60813776 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)14:21:35")

">>60813640
It's the story of rules though.
>Gaze cuts everything, except lead
>Can't use iron or bronze in the temple, because it's unholy.
>Only way to cut stones is with magic eye beems (loop hole)"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60813915 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)14:28:55")

">>60813640
>God demands a task be performed
>"Also do it under these conditions that seem impossible"
>But somebody is smart enough to know how it isn't impossible and what must be done to complete the task while following the asinine extra rule.
>"No tools? Well we'll just find the magic laser worm from the dawn of time!"
It speaks a lot to the cultural history of the Jewish people -- theirs is a religion and a society predicated on laws, so many of their stories are naturally about how to live within laws, even those that seem at first to be more unreasonable than what the storytellers put up with on a daily basis. It's a distinctive outgrowth of a society that had its origin in a harsh territory where leaders exerted little control over their people. Thus, they needed an additional source of Law. Contrast this with the later Christianity, which in its formative years had Rome to hand down the law. The need for a stable society was met, so the teachings focus on moralistic or good action rather than on right, necessary, or proper action, largely leaving the idea of Law to secular authorities ("Render unto Cesar that which is Caesar's" and all that) while adherents of the faith are instead instructed to mindsets of kindness and charity as voluntary actions."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60814037 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)14:35:10")

">>60809355
I just use Enochian lore, better than the stereotypical rabbinical folklore"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60814416 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)14:54:29")

">>60813915
While a lot of Judaism busies itself with laws and the interpretation thereof, you do realize that (just like all religions, really) it also hugely emphasizes the familiar repertoire of virtues, right? Compassion, generosity, kindness, politeness, etc. One of the oldest Jewish sayings is "Manners precede the Torah" - you can be the most brilliant theological scholar in the world but you're not a good person if you're a dick

Related to this is the folk belief surrounding the four sacred plants collected on the Sukkot holiday: myrtle, which has a pleasant scent but tastes foul, stands for people who are learned but unkind. Palm, which is associated with a sweet tasting fruit but has no smell, stands for kind people with no knowledge. Willow, which has neither, stands for people who have neither and citron stands for the ideal individual, who has both knowledge and kindness. As they are ranked by rabbis, the people represented by the willow are often seen as being in a better state (or worthier) than those represented by the myrtle, as it's only natural that someone with no knowledge [of spiritual matters] will be unkind, but to have knowledge and still act against it is plain foul."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60815389 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)15:47:53")

">>60809355
My home brew setting takes place between the fall of man and the flood."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60815538 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)15:56:25")

">>60814416
That's totally legit but as you say it's "Like all religions" in that regard, while the interest in law is, while not unique, something that sets Judaism apart from its near relatives, and I find it an interesting statement on the formative aspects of culture (Similar to the comparison that can be made between the tempers and demands of the gods of Egypt as opposed to those of Mesopotamian cultures when compared with the corresponding climates and especially the 'temperments' of the Nile as opposed to the Tigris and Euphrates)"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60816073 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)16:28:57")

">>60813776
Convenience isn't a loophole"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60816138 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)16:32:59")

">>60810135
Leviathan isn’t just any sea dragon. It’s the great primordial serpent Yaweh fought and killed in the dark waters of chaos before he formed the world from its corpse."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60816740 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)17:08:40" && image=="quandisa_by_skirill-dc3bcrt.jpg")

">>60809355
I'm currently writing a savage worlds sci-fi mecha setting which is based on Judeo-Christian mythology focusing primarily on the Kabbalah . I was originally going to make it it's own game but designing a system from scratch proved to be too much work on top of real life jobs. But yeah it has everything from Dybbuks to Rephaim and two of the main enemy factions are Leviathan and it's brood and the Kings of Edom - who have a really interesting backstory in the Kabbalah. Pic attached is one of the larger spawn of Leviathan."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60816753 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)17:09:28")

">thread about jewish stuff
>no conspiracy theories
huh, that's a nice change of pace"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60816873 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)17:16:13")

">>60816740
>I'm currently writing a savage worlds sci-fi mecha setting which is based on Judeo-Christian mythology focusing primarily on the Kabbalah
Evangelion?"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60816902 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)17:17:49")

">>60816753
>be anon
>go into good thead
>have nothing constructive to say
>hurr durr I know I'll bait /pol/
You're as bad as they are."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60817048 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)17:26:38" && image=="Hebrew Universe.png")

">>60816740
So what, the players drive golems and fight off the monsters and Elomites?

Personally I've always been a fan of Flat Earth+Sky as a Physical Barrier."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60817449 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)17:50:12" && image=="Air Battle.jpg")

">>60816873
It has been an influence, though not one of the primary ones. I would describe it's more like Xenosaga meets Book of the New Sun."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60817472 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)17:51:20")

">>60816902
>>60816753
I don’t think you’reas bad as /pol/, and am happy you are relieved at their absense.

>>60809355
Maybe not fairytale or folklore tier, but even if I knoe shit about them I am always fascinated by hebrew depictions & descriptions of angels in the bible, in the taudic texts of Rabbinical discourse, in apocrypha, and maybe the Zohar?"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60817531 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)17:54:11")

">>60814416
the 4 plants of Sukkot have almost as many explanations as there are words in the Torah. There is a strong tradition of explaining that when there are X of something in a ritual, it is analogous to the X different kinds of people, most often some combination of the states learned, unlearned, nice, not nice, curious, stupid etc.
Seeing as the Sukkot festival is a harvest festival and with the quite mixed history of Judea my personal theory is that the plants originally represented the coming together of various regions to complete the harvest and celebrating their achievement through unity. This is also why the Sukkot is an house with no walls; a rest area open for all"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60817891 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)18:14:46" && image=="Shitty Cosmology Chart.png")

">>60817048
Players take the role of mage-knights who pilot mecha powered by crystalline cores that are a manifested state of angels and demons. These entities were once able to incarnate into more human forms but due to an influx of Nephilim and Cambion hybrids God placed restrictions on how such beings could interact with humans. By becoming the power source to mecha they are still able to influence those that pilot the machines they animate but are not able to copulate with humanity.

The actual game is set on a planet named Yashar in a dimension that is close to Earth's and shares many similarities with it. I use the four celestial worlds for cosmology with Atziluth and Beri'ah acting as points that filter Ein-Sof's energy through the Sephira which comprises the multiverse.The lesser dimensions are comprised of countless Beri'ah realms which are a worlds personal heavens and hells and Assiah the material planes where humans dwell.

I have a shitty ms paint map of it - which unlike the other stuff I have posted hasn't been done by a professional artist. I do have a very pretty Sefirot-Qlippoth diagram done though if you want to see it."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818155 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)18:27:49" && image=="triangle.gif")

">>60813358
It's not just that. The entire culture is built around tongue-in-cheek rule-breaking. Ask any Chassidic Jew how you deal with Shabbat:
>Hire a non-jew to literally do the work for you because only you need to follow these extra rules.
>Install automatic systems so you can just go 'oh, I didn't expect that!'
>Literally silently designate a group sinner, who will break the sabbath (e.g. turning on the TV), after which everyone will groan and complain, but not do anything to 'fix' the situation (e.g. turn off the TV, which counts as more work).
>Can't make your way to synagogue because it's too far? No problem, let's just abuse a technicality about where the boundaries of a synagogue are defined and make it so that the entire city is now the synagogue!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eruv

From a religious perspective, the Torah is so confusing (613 commandments, of which many are rather vague) that rabbis have basically agreed that, in order to avoid pissing off God, you just take it all over the top. God says not to 'cook a kid in its mother's milk'? Well, we don't know if that's literal, a turn of phrase about animal cruelty, or even something about sustainable farm management. Guess the solution is to just never eat any meat with any milk just in case.

Jews largely don't seek to convert and they largely don't seek to enforce their rules on others. They were given the 'benefit' of being born Jewish, and, with that, have to follow all these rules. They know everyone else doesn't have to, so loopholes are just a way to become a little more normal.

>>60809355
Now use all this to turn your not!Jews into fey. Rules everywhere. So many rules you can't keep track. Disobey them and bad things happen (YHWH and all), but it's very rules-as-written, so extreme loopholing is allowed. Throw a roleplaying puzzle at your players, or even a combat scenario where these rules can turn the tide of the battle!"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818334 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)18:37:01")

"Recently I learned (on /pol/, of all places, if you could believe that) an interesting fact about the whole YHWH situation: apparently, it's not actually God's name. It's more or less a Hebrew pun. God's response to Moses' question of His identity "I AM that I AM" was originally a little different in Hebrew due to the lack of a present tense of the "to be" verb. In the Hebrew version of the bible God's answer was a lot more obviously a vague dodge, sort of a "It doesn't matter what I am, I am whatever you make of me". So Moses modifies the verb used (Eheye) using some grammatical wizardry to force it into a Hebrew present tense template, creating the sort-of-word "Yhwh".

So actually, "Yhwh" really just literally means "That", or "It is", or "The Existence"."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818410 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)18:40:38")

">>60818334
Can confirm, Hebrew grammar can be nightmarishly complex but so long as you know the rules well it is EXTRAORDINARILY flexible. Making up words by layering grammatical principles on top of each other and applying some root letters is not only possible, it's almost trivial if you know what you're doing. You could create a word on the fly to describe an action, object or state you want to convey and if you know your Hebrew grammar there's a very good chance any Hebrew speaker would understand perfectly well what you're saying."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818468 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)18:44:34")

">>60818334
That sort of grammar-rule and wordplay seems pretty typical of Judaism, really. I'd guess that's a modern interpretation; other version that I have heard from more antiquated sources have God's answer as 'I am who I am', or, in more plain English (and slightly more spelled out), 'It doesn't goddamn matter who I am; what matters is what I'm offering you.'"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818488 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)18:45:31")

">>60810261
So anime was stealing plots from the jews all along"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818497 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)18:46:07")

">>60818410
This kind of shit is why I find languages so goddamn fascinating. Sounds a bit like, of all things, German, where a lot of the time the word to describe a complex emotional state or idea is to simply mash all the words for it together into one mish-mash of them all."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818711 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)18:57:22")

">>60818468
>>60818497
I heard the Hebrew language compared once to a programming language, or mathematics. It is intensely logical."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818753 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)18:59:27")

">>60818334
>>60818410
>>60818468
It doesn't help that traditional Hebrew has no vowels, so imagine trying to parse the difference between whthr (whether) and whthr (wheather) using context alone. There is also the fun issue where "then" and "and" are the same word so you have some baffling issues like when Jacob makes a covenant with god along the lines of "If God is with me then/and you bring me home safely then/and my family still prospers then/and I am fed I will glorify the God" wherein we're not really sure what parts of the agreement Jacob is asking from God vs what he will promise to do"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818774 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:00:28" && image=="1521832146567.jpg")

">>60818334
YHWH is a combination of different tenses of "to be". Hayah means 'was' and Yehihiye means "will be". Mash the letters together and you get YHWH.
You arent supposed to say God's name outloud, so in casual conversation you say HaShem which means simply "The Name". Even out loud you dont pronounce it as it's written and instead say Adoni which just means "My Lord" Adon (lord) and -i (my/mine).
Of course the English pronunciation of YHWH does not sound similar to the actual genuine way to read the Hebrew. On top of that theres a lot of other names of God each with various degrees of holiness and different meanings. El Shaddai for example is translated as The Hidden One. There are many others.

>>60818497
Hebrew is fascinating in how different roots and letters can be combined to make words. Mayim, the word for "water", is a combination of the letter mem (from) and the word Yam (sea). The word Emet, meaning truth, is a combination of the letter aleph (God) and the word Met (death). I've heard this explained as when you die you get to meet God and see the truth, but really it's open to interpretation.

This is only barely scratching the tip of the iceberg."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818775 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:00:29")

">>60818753
>so imagine trying to parse the difference between whthr (whether) and whthr (wheather) using context alone
dear lord I'm retarded, ignore my idiotic example"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818841 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:04:22" && image=="Storytime.jpg")

">>60817891
I would love to see your pretty diagram."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60818874 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:05:57")

">The word Emet, meaning truth, is a combination of the letter aleph (God) and the word Met (death). I've heard this explained as when you die you get to meet God and see the truth, but really it's open to interpretation.
It could possibly be looked at as wordplay from a different direction:
truth-God=death: There is no truth without god"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819155 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:23:52")

">>60818774
>Mayim, the word for "water", is a combination of the letter mem (from) and the word Yam (sea)
And "Shamayim", the word for "Sky", is a combination of "Sham" (over there) and "Mayim" (water)"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819178 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:25:05")

">>60818774
>El Shaddai
It actually means "God Within the Breast/Chest". El=God, Shad=chest, Shaddai=my chest."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819205 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:26:30")

">>60819178
Are breast and heart synonyms/have the same emotional meaning as in English?"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819254 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:29:15")

">>60819205
In this context, yes.
Since different parts of the bible were written by different people from different cultures in different periods, this isn't always the case. By far the most hilarious is the phrease "Kharon Ap'o", used to signify god's wrath, literally translating as something like "wrath was visible on [god's] nose". Apparently some ancient middle eastern culture thought the nose was the angriest part of the body."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819280 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:31:09")

">>60819254
Many Jewish theologians find that phrase particularly distasteful, as it presumes God HAS a nose. Any expression involving God's supposedly existent body parts (e.g. "the might of God's arm" smiting the Egyptians) is seen with some disdain because God is not supposed to have and you shouldn't be describing Him as if He has a body. Bodies are for pagan deities."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819391 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:36:51")

">>60819280
Which is curious because isn't it commonly said that God made Adam in His image, so that it implies that God does have some form of body that He based Adam on?"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819405 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:37:44")

">>60819178
I would translate shad to mean pap or teat more than it means chest. Female breast specifically.
Some scholars think the root is from shadad, meaning to destroy or ransack. I think it depends on which of the 13 Aspects is being applied to the interpretation of the meaning of El Shaddai.
All i know is that the Hebrew/English texts I've seen often translate it as "Hidden One" for whatever reason."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819410 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:38:06")

"The Jewish theologian/rabbi/physician/astronomer/lawmaker/linguist/scientist Maimonides once said that the state of "Prophet" is not, in fact, merely bestowed by God but rather is achieved through attaining perfection of the body (through medicine and fitness) mind (through the practice of logic) and spirituality (by exercising virtue and mastering spiritual knowledge). Such a state is attainable by any human being, including women and non-Jews (an idea that other Jewish philosophers of the time would've raised an eyebrow at). According to Maimonides the universal attainment of such a perfect state is in fact humanity's purpose for existence.

He also preached that there's no studying religion without first studying science, that "physics borders on metaphysics", that science is a holy undertaking (as it increases our understanding of God's creation and therefore God) and that if he was shown empirical proof of magic or astrological divination (which he regularly ridiculed) that would mean magic is merely a form of science and thus not heretical to study."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819463 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:41:39")

">>60819391
In the English translation. The Hebrew translation uses vague phrasing which implies Adam might've been "merely" created in the image of an angel.

There's also the fact that the bible tells two creation stories in rapid succession, similar but with a number of key differences (e.g. in one mankind is created from nothing, in the image of a divine being, "man and woman", to be the crown jewel of creation, whereas in the other man is created from clay to be a tender of creation and a woman is made from his rib). Jewish theologians have long argued the significance of this, with some believing this is to indicate that one story describes a spiritual creation, and one a physical creation. Thus it is possible man was created in the image of the divine from a spiritual perspective but his body is still "clay" (base physical matter)."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819572 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:48:24")

">>60819410
He also wrote an absolutely fascinating treatise on the subject of charity, discussing in great depth the reasoning, consequences and logic of charity. He defined 8 levels of charity giving, ranking them from most to least desirable, and detailed the significance of each. For example, the highest level of charity is one that allows the needy to attain self-sufficiency (so they would not need charity anymore), charity given anonymously and indirectly ranks higher than charity given in person (lest you be tempted to give to charity for the selfish reason of wanting to appear generous, humiliate the needy and cause them to appear indebted to you), charity given out of pity ranks VERY low (you should feel genuine care for the needy, not pity, which is a form of condescension), and the very lowest level, only barely better from not giving to charity at all, is charity given unwillingly or out of a sense of obligation. If you don't truly want to give to charity, Maimonides reasons, perhaps you simply shouldn't."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819601 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:50:00")

">>60819463
"Adam" just means earth. Adam was the earth creature. It wasn't until the creation of Eve (Chalvah) that he becomes Eesh, meaning Man. First he's just the being of earth until being separated into Man and Woman, higher beings with understanding.
There's a parallel there with the creation of the universe narrative, where God separates Tohu VaVohu (usually translated as formless chaos) into Light and Darkness. Once there is distinction then there can be complexity. It could be similar to the eastern idea of Duality, but I havent studied that much."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819619 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:51:02" && image=="SefirotQlippoth.gif")

">>60818841
Sorry about the wait Anon. Here's the diagram. It's arranged so that each point has the name of a Sephira followed by the head angel or demon that presides over it and then finally the legion of spirits they command. Above is the tree of life and below the tree of death. While there were plenty of diagrams with just the Sefirot I wanted one that had both it and the Qlippoth so I had it commissioned."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819634 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:52:11")

">>60819601
The original language gives the stories more interesting meanings to the various themes in it."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819660 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:53:25")

">>60819601
If you want to get technical, Adam is another example of the flexibility of Hebrew grammar. "Earth" is "Adama". If you treat the final "a" as a suffix, it could be seen as a feminine object, or (more commonly, due to the presence of the letter Heh), related to God. To create "Adam", the letter "Heh" is removed from "Adama", creating a masculine counterpart which is removed from God."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819757 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)19:58:55" && image=="Adam Kadmon.jpg")

">>60819601
In some accounts Adam (and humanity in general really) is simply the projection of a higher being known as Adam Kadmon that serves as a platonic archetype for our species. This entity was so close to God that many Angels mistook it for the creator and worshiped it when it first appeared. In Kabbalah however creation is seen as dualistic so there is a second archetype we draw from being Adam Belial - also known as Edom Belial which is where mankinds wickedness comes from."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819797 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:01:35")

">>60819757
Belial=beli(devoid [of]) al (superior, supreme, upright)"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819815 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:02:37")

">>60819757
>>60819797
Kadmon=First, Primary (also used to mean "old")"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60819890 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:08:08")

">>60819815
>>60819797

Awesome - I'm familiar with a lot of the Kabalistic lore but not actually fluent in Hebrew so this is pretty fascinating etymologically."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820111 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:27:05")

">>60810261

Another version of the myth has it that the Shamir's gaze was harnessed in the cutting of the gems for the Hoshen, a sacred breastplate worn by the high priest which bore 12 different gems symbolizing the tribes of Israel.

Fun fact: we don't actually know what the gems are because this part of the text is so ridiculously old that the words used to describe them don't have context. We can only make educated guesses based on our knowledge of other languages (e.g. "Bareket" probably means "emerald" because it was translated to a word closely related to the Greek "smargadus", known to originate from an older language) or the linguistic composition of the words (e.g. "Odem" is assumed to be sard because it has the Hebrew root word for "red").

The most names of the gemstones and their most commonly accepted meanings are:

Odem (sard)
Pit'da (topaz)
Bareket (emerald)
Nopekh (garnet)
Sappiyr (sapphire)
Yahalom (diamond)
Leshem (ligure)
Shebuw (agate)
Achlama (amethyst)
Tarshish (chrysolite)
Shoham (onyx)
Jashepheh (Jasper)

Many of the words are closely related to various Hebrew grammatical roots, making speculations all the more fun (e.g. "Yahalom" probably comes from the root verb "Halam", meaning "befitting" or "appropriate")"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820144 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:30:21")

">>60819572
This last bit in particular ties into what I find so fascinating about Hebrew/Jewish theology: that God looked at the world as it is now, and said, 'It is good'. That the things of this world, the desires and pleasures and sorrows aren't just some dross to be discarded and ignored, as the more gnostic Christianity would have you believe, but that the Divine looked at it and said, "Yeah, this is pretty okay.""
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820146 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:30:22")

">>60820111
>Many of the words are closely related to various Hebrew grammatical roots, making speculations all the more fun (e.g. "Yahalom" probably comes from the root verb "Halam", meaning "befitting" or "appropriate")

It's actually funnier than that: depending on the context used, "halam" can also be the root of the verb "[to] strike" (a strike is "mahaluma", which fits the grammatical template used to turn a verb into a noun representing the performance of an action). It is theorized by some this is to indicate diamonds were called because of their "striking" beauty (Hebrew didn't have that expression but the ancient Hebrews did have an imagination, and it's not hard to assume they could've drawn parallels between the shock of seeing great beauty and the shock of being struck)."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820177 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:32:52" && image=="selucid.jpg")

">>60820111
Tarshish? Isn't that the city that Jonah was instructed to go to tell repent trying to run away and eventually getting eaten by the fish?"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820217 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:36:25")

">>60820177
That's Nineveh, you fucking pleb."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820231 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:37:30")

">>60820144
Incidentally, Maimonides also wrote extensively on the subject of evil (specifically why there's evil in the world of a benevolent God). His answer clearly draws from his experience as a scientist: to create something by causing the opposite of its existence to cease to exist is not the same thing as simply creating it. God created GOOD, but nowhere does it say God filled the universe with it. What we perceive is "Evil" is just the absence of Good. Good is divine in origin, but Evil is mundane and usually human in origin. That said, Maimonides also said that while it may seem as if reality is largely Evil that is simply a case of human narrow-mindedness: as an astronomer, he was absolutely fascinated by the vastness of the universe and deduced that anywhere except Earth (that is to say the vast majority of creation) good is overwhelmingly more common, as there are no humans to fuck it up.

Also interestingly, he divided evil into three kinds: which is inflicted on humans by the universe (which he considered a tiny minority of cases), which humans inflict on each other (relatively little) and which humans inflict on themselves (by giving in to their base urges). It's the last one, Maimonides believed, which made up the vast, vast, vast majority of Evil in the universe. The cure for Evil was rationality and self-control. God intended this, and all is according to plan."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820244 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:38:49")

">>60820177
>>60820217
He's half right. Nineveh is the city he was supposed to go to. Tarshish was the one that the ship he takes to try to get out of it was headed."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820250 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:39:24")

">>60820231
Yeah, but my big problem theologically with Maimonides is that he essentially gave rise and justification to the Gnostic stance of Christianity: because the world is created to force mankind into evil, evil is inevitable, and therefore only rejecting the world is the proper path."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820292 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:42:15")

">>60820250
Not really. The world was not created to force mankind to be evil - mankind was simply not created forced to be good (it's that dichotomy again). Mankind possesses a potential for evil (I don't even think he'd have gone as far as to call it an "inclination"), but equally a potential to overcome it."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820309 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:43:38")

">>60820292
Could be related to his stance on free will. Maimonides was seriously pissed at concepts which denied it. It's why he thought astrology was so stupid - he believed mankind's fundamental nature involved free will and you can't have free will if the course of your life is dictated by planets."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820358 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:47:06")

">>60820250
True, Maimonides himself didn't mandate the inclination to evil - but those who came after built on his ideological framework to add that in. Which I suppose is a bit like blaming Alfred Nobel for all explosive weaponry ever, but I, unlike God, have never claimed to be fair."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820403 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:50:15")

">>60820358
It would help you to realize the man was an outspoken fan of Thomas Aquinas, and almost definitely embraced the idea that the soul is inseparable from the body. The soul is divine and inherently good, but the body is biological and possesses urges which can lead to evil. However, through logic and self control, the soul can rein the body in, overriding any physical potential for evil and achieving a state of perfection."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820449 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:53:07")

">>60809355
I like to play as any type of priest in modern or scifi settings when but if rabbi is an option I go with them
My CoC one is doing quite well so far"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820470 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:54:58")

">>60820403
...you know, I didn't think I could dislike Maimonides even more. And then you go and tell me that he liked fucking Aquinas, of all people.

Man, fuck the both of them."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820475 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)20:55:30")

"/tg/ - Theology and Grammar

Never change, /tg/, never change."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820705 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)21:14:06")

">>60818753

In Semitic languages the consonants determine the meaning and the vowels determine the variation on that meaning. Deciphering the bible can be very difficult but it's not quite as bad as you make it out to be, because the basic idea behind the meaning will be clear."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820755 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)21:17:52" && image=="1326173544313.jpg")

">>60820475
agreed, it's been a while since we've had a truly good thread around here.
Once my life calms the fuck down maybe I'll start hosting mythology threads on the weekends"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820837 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)21:25:18")

">>60818774
>Hayah means 'was' and Yehihiye means "will be". Mash the letters together and you get YHWH.
So that’s why Christians call him the Alpha and the Omega."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820869 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)21:27:19")

">>60818874
Could it also mean that the death of god brings truth?"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60820964 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)21:34:05" && image=="ptcpgm6.jpg")

">>60818753
>>60820705
I don't know if this is widely known but certain letters in the Torah are also specifically enlarged or shrank. So not only is there interpretation with the punctuation, the vowels/meaning, but theres also different meanings and explanations for why certain letters are written the way they are.
For example the first letter Beit in Breishit (In the Beginning) is written extra big. Out loud, "Beit" is a word that means house or dwelling. The Holy Temple is called the Beit Hamikdash (house of holiness) and many people that the enlarged letter in the creation story is foreshadowing to the future Holy Temple. That's just one example from the top of my head.
I think much if not most of the depth of the text is lost in translation. Pic is how i feel trying to understand ancient hebrew"
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60821003 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)21:36:32")

">>60820869
I guess. But that removes the fun Golem wordplay. The Golem was said to have אמת (truth) written on its forehead. to turn it off, erase the א, leaving only מת(death)."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60821357 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)21:57:34")

">>60820964
I would caution you with the notion that that sort of lettering is only seen in medieval era and later Masoretic texts. For instance, the Qumrani Genesis fragments do not have the enlarged initial letter, and I don't think they have the enlarged letteration of the Shema either, although I'd need to double check that."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==60821381 && dateTime=="07/12/18(Thu)21:58:30")

">>60820964
A large portion of early Hebrew and Judaism was oral teachings. The great temple was also destroyed twice causing a dispersal and recollection of Jewish clans, it's only natural that a tremendous amount of reinterpretation has occurred."
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}
}