import 4.code.options;
import 4.code.about;

class Header{

public void title(){

String fullTitle = "/diy/ - Do-It-Yourself";
}

public void menu();

public void board();

public void goToBottom();

public void refresh(a);

}
class Thread extends Board{
public void EmptyTitle(OP Anonymous){

String fullTitle = "EmptyTitle";
int postNumber = "1535280";
String image = "Standard-psu-100021930-orig[1].jpg";
String date = "01/12/19(Sat)03:35:59";
String comment = "My monitor's PSU (which is an external powerbrick) died and I thought of replacing it with either a computer PSU or one of those regulable laptop chargers in which you can select the voltage so it works for different laptops.

I don't know much about this stuff but from my understanding as long as I input the same volts and amps to the monitor it should work fine.

This is what's on the power brick:

Input: 100-240v 50/60Hz 1.0 A max
Output: 19v 1.7A

Questions:
How would I make a computer PSU output 19v when the highest a computer PSU rail goes is 12v?

If I buy a laptop charger that already outputs 19v BUT gives 3.5amps, will this fry the monitor due to giving it too many amps?

I want to put a fuse in the cable when I wire the thing for safety, can you use whatever fuse in whatever place? For instance, a car fuse is interchangeable with a regular filament fuse?

Is there a cheaper solution to this that isn't change the capacitors in the broken powerbrick and hope it works? (I don't want to try this route because it's not guaranteed it's the caps and there are no stores that sell these things in my area because people don't repair nowadays, just replace, don't want to wait china shipping time and cheapest capacitor kit in amazon is about the same price as a computer PSU or laptop powerbrick).

My current knowledge:
Too many volts will break it
Too few volts might break it
Know what resistance is
No idea about amps

My equipment:
Multimeter (don't know how to use but will figure it out)
Regulable soldering iron
60/40 solder
Flux
Heatshrink tube

Is this doable for someone without experience?"
;

}
public void comments(){
if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535282 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)03:37:48")

">>1535280
Grab the monitor power brick.

Turn it over.

Write down the amps and volts.

Put that into ebay with DC on the end.

Boom done.

Well, you might have to measure the DC plug size."
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535285 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)04:02:18")

">>1535280

You'd have to fuck with the feedback to whatever handles the switch(es) that drives the inductor(s) in order to get an ATX PSU to change its output. Difficult at worst, pain in the ass at best, not something I'd recommend if you're not competent with electronics either way. This is all assuming it would be okay with the 50%+ increase in output voltage in the first place, which it almost certainly won't.

Go with the power brick. As long as it's rated to at least the 1.7A that the monitor requires and can manage around 19V (you probably have at least +/- 1V of leeway), it'll be fine. Just make sure the polarity of the plug matches. Usually pin positive, sleeve negative, but that's an unofficial standard and not to be assumed as the case.


As a quick and dirty lesson, amp rating on a LOAD (like a light bulb, monitor, phone, or whatever) is how much current it needs to operate. Amp rating on a SUPPLY (whether that be a power brick, USB adapter, or wall outlet) is how much current it can deliver, continuously, without overheating or blowing up. The rating on the load is the MINIMUM that the supply needs to be able to handle, but it doesn't need to match exactly; it's better that the supply can deliver more than the load needs, up to a point."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535294 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)04:24:13")

">>1535280
>If I buy a laptop charger that already outputs 19v BUT gives 3.5amps, will this fry the monitor due to giving it too many amps?
No, the monitor will draw 1.7A is all. More amps just gives a bigger reserve, doesn't automatically cause bigger draw so long as the voltage matches. You can buy the laptop charger."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535305 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)04:55:58" && image=="1545918007844.jpg")

">>1535280
What the fuck is wrong with you that you would BUY, not use something you already have, but go out and BUY a laptop charger or PSU, instead of just buying the right fucking cable for your monitor? HOW can you even justify asking us if you can go out and acquire the WRONG cable specifically to nigger rig it when it would be just as easy if not easier to acquire the RIGHT cable.
I've actually read your post 3 times because I assumed I'm just missing something because you can't actually be this stupid, but you are this stupid. Just find the model number on the sticker on the back of your monitor and google it and just buy the right God damned cable you incredulous autist."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535401 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)09:54:12")

">>1535282
>>1535285
>>1535294
Alright thanks, I'm gonna do the power brick thing. I've already looked up a 19v brick and it's very well priced. I'll probably have to solder the old jack to the new brick since they don't match
>Usually pin positive, sleeve negative
But how will I know which cable goes to the sleeve and which goes to the pin? It's all hidden under the rubber.
>>1535305
>reads my post 3 times and thinks I'm talking about getting a "cable"
>ur stupid
lol"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535403 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)10:00:54")

"Also
>>1535285
>As a quick and dirty lesson, amp rating on a LOAD (like a light bulb, monitor, phone, or whatever) is how much current it needs to operate. Amp rating on a SUPPLY (whether that be a power brick, USB adapter, or wall outlet) is how much current it can deliver, continuously, without overheating or blowing up. The rating on the load is the MINIMUM that the supply needs to be able to handle, but it doesn't need to match exactly; it's better that the supply can deliver more than the load needs, up to a point.
>>1535294
>No, the monitor will draw 1.7A is all. More amps just gives a bigger reserve, doesn't automatically cause bigger draw so long as the voltage matches. You can buy the laptop charger.

Then what is the point of fuses? If the devices just take what they need why would them be needed?"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535405 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)10:09:14")

">>1535401
>But how will I know which cable goes to the sleeve and which goes to the pin? It's all hidden under the rubber.
By using your multimeter (continuity mode)

>>1535403
Fuses usually protect cables and prevent fires. But to answer that question more specifically you would have to provide an example."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535410 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)10:15:23")

">>1535405
>By using your multimeter (continuity mode)
So it will tell me which one is which? I've never used it honestly.
>Fuses usually protect cables and prevent fires. But to answer that question more specifically you would have to provide an example.
How would a fuse help between a PSU and a device if the current will never exceed the device's requested current?"
;


if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535411 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)10:23:51")

">>1535410
Yes, stick one probe into the plug, touch a cable with the other. If it beeps, it's this one."
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if(Anonymous && title=="" && postNumber==1535416 && dateTime=="01/12/19(Sat)10:36:38")

">>1535411
Ah, alright, that makes sense."
;


}
}